Category: Southern Georgian Bay and Lake Simcoe

Fun and Relaxation in Wasaga Beach

Wasaga Beach, located in Simcoe County, is not only a lovely town to visit, it also boasts the longest freshwater beach in the world. With an intriguing history that dates back to the days of fur trading, when it served as the gateway to the great Northwest, this lovely town served as a strategic location during the War of 1812; during the rest of the 19th century, lumber was the main industry, as the sandy soil here is unsuitable for farming. It was during the 1900s that families began to visit the area for its beauty. Wasaga Beach gradually became […]

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Enjoy Year-Round Fun at Scenic Caves Natural Adventures

At Collingwood‘s Scenic Caves Natural Adventures, you can take an eco-adventure with zip lines, trekking through the treetops, and more; or, you can walk across the suspension bridge, which at 126 metres, is Ontario‘s longest. During the winter months, a fantastic trail system offers snowshoeing and cross country skiing; these are just a few examples of all that awaits adventurers of all ages at this magnificent natural getaway. Let’s take a closer look. Self-Guided Walking Tours: Caves and More One of the best ways to take in the natural beauty Scenic Caves Adventures offers is to take the self-guided walking […]

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Want to Enjoy a New Adventure? Try Tree Top Trekking in Ontario!

Standing on the ground, far below the treetops, you might have often wondered just what it would be like to make your way through the trees, above the forest floor. Maybe you believe that you’ll have to travel all the way to a tropical jungle for a tree top trek, but there are actually some great places to explore the forest’s canopy, right here in Ontario. Horseshoe Resort At Horseshoe Resort, which is just outside of Barrie, you can don a harness and experience an unforgettable trip through the treetops. The resort offers a number of fun and challenging courses […]

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Quench Your Thirst at Ontario’s Breweries

Beer was first introduced to Canada by seventeenth century European settlers, and until Prohibition reared its tea-totalling head, Canadian citizens enjoyed delicious frothy brew with meals and at celebrations, and exported it for other nations to savour. Despite a number of laws that forbade citizens from drinking, the government did allow several exceptions, with wineries being exempted from closure, and with a number of distilleries and breweries remaining open to support the export market. A few of these survived until Prohibition ended, and during the late twentieth century, a number of new breweries began producing quality beers of all kinds. […]

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